Recent Searches
Clear
Toyo Bunko Museum
Toyo Bunko Museum

Toyo Bunko Museum

star-5
10 Reviews
2-chōme-28-21 Honkomagome, Bunkyō-ku, Tokyo, 113-0021

The Basics

Visit this under-the-radar Tokyo museum (also known as the Oriental Library) to take in its educational and entertaining exhibits on Asian history. View exhibition rooms and audio-visual displays alongside cultural treasures, source materials, and artworks on display. It’s well worth a visit for those with an interest in Japanese and Asian history and culture. Purchase tickets online in advance, or add a museum visit to a private sightseeing tour of Tokyo.

Show all

Things to Know Before You Go

  • Toyo Bunko is a must-visit for those with an interest in Asian culture and history.

  • There is a restaurant and a gift shop on site.

  • The museum is accessible to wheelchair users.

  • There is a free guided tour every day at 3pm (in Japanese only).

Show all

How to Get There

The museum is an 8-minute walk from Komagome Station on the JR Yamanote Line and the Tokyo Metro Namboku Line. It’s a 7-minute walk from Sengoku Station on the Toei Subway Mita Line and a 15-minute walk from Sugamo Station on the JR Yamanote and Toei Subway Mita Line.

Show all

Trip ideas

How to Get Around in Tokyo

How to Get Around in Tokyo


When to Get There

Toyo Bunko is open Wednesday through Monday from morning until evening (last admission is 30 minutes before close). It is closed on Tuesdays, except when a national holiday falls on a Tuesday, in which case the museum is open on the holiday and then closed on Wednesday. It's also closed on New Year’s Day.

Show all

The Morrison Archive

Upstairs from Orient Hall (the main exhibition space) look for what is possibly the museum’s most important collection, the Morrison Archive. Collected by the Australian journalist, George Ernest Morrison during his 20-year residency in Beijing, it contains approximately 24,000 volumes, including about 1,000 map/lithograph titles, about 7,200 pamphlets, and more than 120 periodicals. Of particular note are 54 editions of Marco Polo'sDescription of the World, including a copy of the first Latin printing from 1485.

Show all