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Temple of Caesar (Tempio di Cesare)
Temple of Caesar (Tempio di Cesare)

Temple of Caesar (Tempio di Cesare)

Via della Salara Vecchia, 5/6, Rome, Italy, 00186

The Basics

The Temple of Caesar (Temple of Divus Iulius) was largely dismantled in the 15th century, so little of the original structure still stands. Visit with a guide who can help interpret these and other important ruins in the Roman Forum as part of an ancient Rome tour. Most include stops at Rome’s top archaeological sites paired with skip-the-line access to the Colosseum. Travelers with children can opt for a family-friendly tour.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • Wear a hat and comfortable shoes and apply sunscreen when visiting the Temple of Caesar, which is in the outdoor Roman Forum archaeological site.

  • Visitors cannot enter the temple ruins—only view them from the outside.

  • The Forum is an especially fascinating tour for Roman history enthusiasts and can be fun for kids when visited with a family-friendly guide.

  • The site is accessible to wheelchair users via an elevator at the entrance, though the remains themselves are spread across rough terrain and only a portion is easy to navigate with a wheelchair.

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How to Get There

The Roman Forum is located alongside the Colosseum and Palatine Hill in the center of Rome near the Colosseo station on metro line B, which also stops at the main Termini train station.

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Trip ideas


When to Get There

Visit the Roman Forum, located outdoors, in early morning or late afternoon in summer to avoid the midday heat and crowds. If visiting in winter, opt for mild days with clear skies if possible. The archaeological site tends to be less crowded midweek than on weekends.

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The Legend of the Temple of the Comet Star

The Temple of Caesar is also known as the Temple of the Comet Star and is the only sacred building dating from the Roman era to be devoted to a comet. It is said that a few years after Caesar’s death, a comet appeared over Rome for seven days. Many Romans took it to be the soul of the deified Julius Caesar, as well as an endorsement of the ascension of Augustus Caesar, his successor.

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