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Helsinki Music Centre (Musiikkitalo)
Helsinki Music Centre (Musiikkitalo)

Helsinki Music Centre (Musiikkitalo)

Mannerheimintie 13A, Helsinki, Finland, 00100

The basics

While anyone can visit the lobby and café, you need to purchase a ticket to gain access to the performance spaces. Performances span genres from classical music to pop to jazz, and tickets can be booked in advance or at the door. If you’re on a tight budget, look out for tickets to rehearsals, which take place in advance of the main evening performance. Or check the center’s online calendar for free events, which may include meet-and-greets with musicians, student performances, and family-friendly concerts. Many hop-on hop-off bus tours—as well as bike and Segway tours—pass by the Helsinki Music Centre, while some architecture tours of Helsinki also stop at the center. In summer, the center hosts hour-long guided tours.

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Things to know before you go

  • Helsinki Music Centre is fully wheelchair-accessible.
  • There is a café, terrace restaurant, and cloakroom at the center.
  • Wear whatever you feel comfortable in—there is no dress code at the center.
  • Most concerts have an intermission, which typically lasts for about 20 minutes.
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How to get there

The Helsinki Music Centre sits opposite Parliament House (Eduskuntatalo) in Helsinki’s Töölö district. It is easily accessible by public transit: Helsinki Central Station is less than 10 minutes away. The nearest tram stops are the National Museum (Kansallismuseo) stop (served by lines 4 and 10) and Lasipalatsi (served by lines 1, 2, 4, and 10).

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When to get there

Performance spaces typically open about 20 minutes before the start time. Give yourself ample time to get there as late arrivals may have to wait until the interval to enter.

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Art at the Helsinki Music Centre

Visitors to Helsinki Music Centre will encounter several artworks dotted around the grounds. Look for Kirsi Kaulanen’s Gaia sculpture—named after the Greek goddess of the Earth— is suspended from the ceiling of the main lobby, and for Reijo Hukkanen’s Laulupuut (Song Trees), a totem-like sculpture on the plaza outside the center, which depicts a giant pike reaching skyward with his sharp-toothed mouth wide open.

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Frequently Asked Questions
The answers provided below are based on answers previously given by the tour provider to customers’ questions.
Q:
What are the nearest attractions to Helsinki Music Centre (Musiikkitalo)?
Q:
What else should I know about attractions in Helsinki?
A:
As well as visiting the Helsinki Music Centre (Musiikkitalo), check out these trip ideas to make the most of your visit: